Tips for Exercising in Cold Weather

» Posted by on Oct 24, 2013 in Blog, Fitness, Healthy Living | 0 comments

A combination of being sort of surprised by the drop in temperature coupled with some questions we got at boot camp this morning, here are some tips to staying warm when escaping the four walls for a fitness session.  Enjoy!

 

Stay safe during cold-weather exercise

Almost everyone can exercise safely during cold weather. But if you have certain conditions, such as asthma, heart problems or Raynaud’s disease, check with your doctor before you work out in cold weather.

 

Dress in layers

First, put on a thin layer of synthetic material, such as polypropylene, which draws sweat away from your body. Avoid cotton, which stays wet next to your skin. Next, add a layer of fleece or wool for insulation. Top this with a waterproof, breathable outer layer. A heavy down jacket or vest may cause you to overheat if you’re exercising hard. If you’re lean, you may need more insulation than someone who is heavier. If it’s very cold, consider wearing a face mask or scarf to warm the air before it enters your lungs.

 

Protect your hands, feet and ears

When it’s cold, blood flow is concentrated on your body’s core, leaving your hands and feet vulnerable to frostbite. Try wearing a thin pair of gloves under a pair of heavier gloves or mittens lined with wool or fleece. Don the mittens or gloves before your hands become cold and then remove them if your hands begin to sweat.

 

Pay attention to weather conditions and wind chill

Wind chill extremes can make exercising outdoors unsafe even if you dress warmly. The wind can penetrate your clothes and remove the insulating layer of warm air that surrounds your body, and any exposed skin is vulnerable to frostbite.

  

Head into the wind

If possible, do the second half of your workout with the wind at your back. This way, you’re less likely to get chilled, especially if you’ve worked up a sweat. This may take some planning of your exercise route before you head out the door.

 

Drink plenty of fluids

Drink water or sports drinks before, during and after your workout, even if you’re not really thirsty. You can become just as dehydrated in the cold as in the heat from sweating, breathing and increased urine production, but it may be harder to notice during cold weather.

 

Know the signs of frostbite and hypothermia

Frostbite is most common on exposed skin, such as your cheeks, nose and ears, but it also can occur on hands and feet. Early warning signs include numbness, loss of feeling or a stinging sensation. If you suspect frostbite, get out of the cold immediately and slowly warm the affected area.  Hypothermia signs and symptoms include intense shivering, slurred speech, loss of coordination and fatigue. Seek emergency help right away for possible hypothermia. 

 Here at JCF Boot Camp, your safety is our priority! WIN THE DAY!!

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